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Illustration by Konstantin Kakanias
For many years, it felt like there was a choice before us: look grown-up and sexy or clomp around like a hearty German tourist. We all knew that flats were practical. But like pencil skirts and straightened hair, high heels denoted polish.
Looking over the fall fashion spreads of designer orthopedic sandals and neon-hued sneakers, I suspect that girls today probably don’t feel the need to wear heels to transform themselves into grown-up women the way I did. Whereas heels were once integral to power dressing, flats now connote a liberation from that stereotype. As clothes have become more gender-neutral, the need to announce our femininity with a percussive soundtrack has vanished.
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Illustration by Konstantin Kakanias

For many years, it felt like there was a choice before us: look grown-up and sexy or clomp around like a hearty German tourist. We all knew that flats were practical. But like pencil skirts and straightened hair, high heels denoted polish.

Looking over the fall fashion spreads of designer orthopedic sandals and neon-hued sneakers, I suspect that girls today probably don’t feel the need to wear heels to transform themselves into grown-up women the way I did. Whereas heels were once integral to power dressing, flats now connote a liberation from that stereotype. As clothes have become more gender-neutral, the need to announce our femininity with a percussive soundtrack has vanished.

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Source: The New York Times
The sight, from across the street, of Francesca Amfitheatrof taking in the morning air on the upstairs balcony of her Brooklyn home — a grand, free-standing 1889 Romanesque Revival townhouse in the eclectic neighborhood of Clinton Hill — might almost be an apparition. Lissome and fair, with a profile that calls to mind a John Singer Sargent portrait, she suggests a vision from a bygone era, the original lady of the house. Yet despite her Old World elegance, Tiffany & Company’s first female design director is very much a modern woman. 
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(Photo: Flora Hanitijo)

The sight, from across the street, of Francesca Amfitheatrof taking in the morning air on the upstairs balcony of her Brooklyn home — a grand, free-standing 1889 Romanesque Revival townhouse in the eclectic neighborhood of Clinton Hill — might almost be an apparition. Lissome and fair, with a profile that calls to mind a John Singer Sargent portrait, she suggests a vision from a bygone era, the original lady of the house. Yet despite her Old World elegance, Tiffany & Company’s first female design director is very much a modern woman. 

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(Photo: Flora Hanitijo)

Source: The New York Times

"Sea of Waves," Deborah Dixon, Helene Curtis, 1960 and "The Skirt’s the Thing," Carmen Dell’Orefice and Betsy Pickering, First Avenue and 23rd, Harper’s Bazaar, 1958.

More fashion photography from William Helburn’s new book.

Leopard, the naughtiest of prints, is back in fashion. Jacket, Givenchy by Riccardo Tisci. Photo by Arno Frugier. Styled by Jason Rider. 
See the full spread on TMagazine.com

Leopard, the naughtiest of prints, is back in fashion. Jacket, Givenchy by Riccardo Tisci. Photo by Arno Frugier. Styled by Jason Rider. 

See the full spread on TMagazine.com

Single earrings so striking that one, worn alone, is enough.
Where to buy 

Single earrings so striking that one, worn alone, is enough.

Where to buy 

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